Category Archives: Mobile

LinkedIn Developer API Javascript Domains for Cordova Mobile App

I was starting a small project making a mobile app using Apache Cordova (PhoneGap) to pull data from LinkedIn. The first step I did was signing up for LinkedIn’s Developer program so that I could obtain an API key.

When filling out the requested information, one of the items threw me for a loop – “Javascript API Domains” which was described as a “Comma separated list of fully-qualified domain name of all pages that will call the JavaScript API. Only needed if using Javascript API. Must include protocol, host, and port (it not 80 or 443).”

While this is a typical question when you are asking a web developer, this would be http://localhost if you are developing locally or simply http://yourdomain if you were hosting it. However, I wasn’t sure how it applied to mobile, and specifically in the case of Cordova.

I initially tried “http://localhost” but received the following error being thrown in LogCat:

"Uncaught Error: You must specify a valid JavaScript API Domain as part of this key's configuration."

After searching around I was able to find other people asking similar questions, however I was unable to find any answers.

It wasn’t until I noticed the following line in the logs did I realise what I should provide as the API Domain.

"I/Web Console: Received Event: deviceready at file:///android_asset/www/js/index.js:53"

Then it occurred to me, all they were looking for was “file:///” and after saving those changes in LinkedIn’s Developer site, I was up and running.

LinkedIn API Domain Key

Google Voice – Create Separate Voicemails for Contacts and Strangers

One of the other features availiable with Google Voice is the ability to create different voicemail messages for different groups of contacts and completely different messages for strangers who call. This was very useful recently when I was interviewing I had set my default voicemail to be a formal message so that it sounds professional for when I am contacted by an employer, and yet when my friends or family call they still hear my normal, short “Hey it Ben leave a message.”

You will first want to set up Google Voice as your primary voicemail which I have previously discussed.

Assuming all of your contacts are already in Google Contacts, which is very simple to do with an Android phone or a Blackberry using Google Sync, they just have to be placed into groups. By going to the Google Contacts page either through Gmail or GV, you need to assign all of the contacts to specific groups (eg. friends, family, etc.). You will be able to specify one voicemail message for each group, so divide them up accordingly.

Now we just need to modify some GV settings.  Go to voice.google.com and go to Settings > Voice Settings on the top right. On the ‘Voicemail & Text’ tab you want to record some greetings (at least one for the public and one for your grouped contacts, but you can choose to record as many as you want).  On this drop down list, set the default voicemail greeting, that is what non-contacts (strangers) will hear when they call you.

On the ‘Groups’ tab you can ‘Edit’ each group and choose which voicemail message those group members will hear.

Swype Finally Sending Out Invitations

Months ago I applied for the Swype beta program but I was too late and they had already closed down the registration so I put my name down to be notified when it would be available again and today I finally got that message.

Swype is pleased to invite you to login and try our Swype Beta for Android.

You signed up to be emailed when this happened, and probably gave up on us. Well, we are (finally) pleased to activate your Swype Beta for Android account. Thanks for being patient over the last 6 months as we’ve been focused on improving the product and preparing for our launch with multiple phone manufacturers and carriers.

Swype had fallen off my radar and I had written it off, never expecting to get to use it on my Droid. I am very excited to give this a shot and I will post my thoughts shortly as I have been using the standard software keyboard these past few months.

Astrid Logo

Switching from Remember the Milk to Producteev with Astrid

A couple of days ago the popular Android tasks application, Astrid, announced that they will no longer be able to provide task syncing with Remember the Milk. Astrid did however give users the option of running an older version of Astrid or a version with certain features disabled (these features violated RTMs ToS and are the reason for this announcement). Additionally, Astrid will work with Producteev and Google Tasks.

I have chosen to jump ship from RTM and try out Producteev which seems to have many of the same features as RTM and the ones that GTasks lack, such as tagging. I was wondering how I was going to get all my tasks/assignments in the middle of the semester over to this new service, but figured I would just try syncing all my information into Producteev with Astrid and cross my fingers.

I signed up for a Producteev account and opened up Astrid on my Droid. I typed in my new credentials under the sync settings for Producteev and a sync began. I opened up the Producteev website and my tasks were immediately popping up, one at a time. To finish up, within Astrid I logged out of RTM sync.

In just a few minutes all my tasks had been accurately moved from RTM to Producteev using Astrid and now I can continue syncing my tasks from my phone to the cloud for safe keeping and easy editing while staying with the most up to date version of Astrid for my phone.

Use Google Voice as your primary Voicemail

Google Voice has some great features available including the ability to use a single phone number by ringing multiple phones, call screening, recording, and more, but if you don’t want to switch to a GV number or port over your existing phone number, you can still reap the benefits that GV offers in the area of voicemail.

These benefits include the ability to access your voicemail from the internet, have your voicemails transcribed into text and emailed and/or sms’ed to you, and keep a record of your messages.

This is actually a very simple process.

All you need to do is login to Google Voice and access the Settings in the upper right hand corner. If you have not already added a phone, you can do so here.

Once this is done you will see a link next to your phone saying “activate Google voicemail on this phone.” Click that link and it will tell you to call a specific number from the phone beginning with a “*”.

Just repeat this process for every phone that you would like to use the GV voicemail for. The process to deactivate this is just as simple. You will see a button in the same location with a number to dial to disable this service.